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Photography Associations Need Input on Group Registrations

Posted by Advocacy Liaison on January 11, 2017

Our colleagues at American Society of Media Photographers, National Press Photographers Association, North American Nature Photography Association, Professional Photographers of America, and the PLUS Coalition are requesting input from professional photographers on their workflow and how they register their copyrights. The associations are responding to a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) from the Copyright Office on group registrations. To formulate their response, they’ve posted a short survey (which you can fill out below, or on the SurveyMonkey website). The results will be used to inform their response to the NOPR.

If you work as a professional photographer, please take a few minutes to fill out the survey. Please ONLY respond if you work as a professional photographer. Survey results are due January 21. Please share this survey with your colleagues.

Create your own user feedback survey

We Need Your Voice on the next Register of Copyrights

Posted by Advocacy Liaison on December 30, 2016

Copyright Office logoThe Graphic Artists Guild needs the help of all visual artists, and all creators and copyright holders.

Here’s the deal: as you probably know, this October, the Librarian of Congress removed Maria Pallante, the Register of Copyrights, from her position. This move was unprecedented, and is a blow to the creative community. Throughout her tenure as Register of Copyrights, Pallante demonstrated her willingness to listen to the concerns of creatives, and her interest in revisiting copyright law and modernizing the Copyright Office so that it can better serve rights holders and users.

Now the Librarian of Congress has taken a second unprecedented move. Instead of conferring with members of Congress and stakeholders, she’s decided to post a Survey Monkey poll, asking the general public to weigh in on the “knowledge, skills, and abilities” the new Register should possess, and what the top three priorities should be.

This means that those who want to weaken copyright protection for creators will be able to weigh in, and influence the selection process. 

So we’re asking all visual artists, and all who rely on a strong copyright system, to respond to the Library of Congress’ survey. Let the Library know that we need a Register who understands the value of copyright, recognizes the need for the Office to be modernized, and has the support of the creative community.

Below are survey responses you can cut-and-paste into the Library’s survey, or which you can use to base your own responses. (Thank you to ASMP, NPPA, and the Copyright Alliance for the original survey responses.)

Please share this message with your fellow creatives on social media, on your blogs, via email, etc. The Library is soliciting responses until January 31st. Let’s make sure our voice isn’t drowned out! #mycopyrightmatters #yourcopyrightmatters


Please cut-and-paste from the responses below, or use these as the basis for your own responses, and respond to the Library’s survey by January 31, 2017.


Model responses for LIbrary of Congress Survey on Register of Copyrights

1. What are the knowledge, skills, and abilities you believe are the most important for the Register of Copyrights?

The next Register of Copyrights must:
• be dedicated to both a robust copyright system and Copyright Office;
• recognize the important role that creators of copyrighted works play in promoting our nation’s financial well-being;
• have significant experience in, and a strong commitment to, the copyright law
•  have a substantial background in representing the interests of creators of copyright works;
•  possess a deep appreciation for the special challenges facing individual creators and small businesses in protecting their creative works.;
•  a keen understanding of, and a strong commitment to, preserving the longstanding and statutorily-based functions of the Copyright Office, especially its advising the House and Senate Judiciary Committees on domestic and international copyright issues; and
•  have the solid support of the copyright community.

2. What should be the top three priorities for the Register of Copyrights?

Priority #1: Continue the traditional and critical role of the Register as a forceful advocate for both a vibrant copyright system and a strong Copyright Office that works closely with the House and Senate Judiciary Committees in promoting a strong and effective copyright law.

Priority #2:   A commitment to moving quickly to modernize the Copyright Office with a special focus on updating and making more affordable and simpler the registration and recordation processes.

Priority #3:  Working with Congress to achieve enactment of legislation creating a small claims process that finally provides individual creators with a viable means of protecting their creative efforts.

 3. Are there other factors that should be considered?

As a creative, I believe, to the extent possible, that the views of those whose works are protected by copyright law should be given greater weight in this survey than those who are not. It is also crucial that the views of the leaders of the House and Senate Judiciary Committees, be given great deference in the selection of the next Register.

First Policy Proposal from Judiciary Committee Hearings Released

Posted by Advocacy Liaison on December 08, 2016

Washington DC, Dec. 8, 2016

John ConyersBob GoodlatteThe Graphic Artists Guild welcomes the first policy proposal resulting from the Judicary Committee’s review of U.S. copyright law, released by House Judiciary Committee Chair Bob Goodlatte (left) and Ranking Member John Conyers (right). The proposal hits upon many concerns raised by visual artists associations: the autonomy of the Copyright Office, modernization of the Office’s IT infrastructure, and copyright small claims reform.

The proposal addresses four major areas: the autonomy of the Copyright office and nomination process of the Register of Copyrights; creation of ad-hoc committees to advise the office on technological advances; IT modernization, including the “searchable, digital database of historical and current copyright ownership information”; and the creation of a copyright small claims system to handle low-value copyright infringement cases.

Fairness for Small Creators Act Introduced

Posted by Advocacy Liaison on December 08, 2016

Washington DC, Dec. 8, 2016

Rep. Lamar SmithRep. Judy ChuThe Graphic Artists Guild applauds the introduction of H.R. 6496, the “Fairness for Small Creators Act” introduced by Rep. Judy Chu [D-NY] and Rep. Lamar Smith [R-TX]. The bill seeks the establishment of a “small claims system within the Copyright Office,” which would provide individual creators an affordable avenue to enforce their copyrights. Small rights holders, such as illustrators, graphic designers, and other visual artists, find the cost of the current system is prohibitively expensive, and are deterred from enforcing their copyrights. This is occuring as online distribution channels and technologies have facilitated rampant infringement of visual works, and as visual artists see income from licensing plummet.

The establishment of a small claims system could go far to redress this situation. H.R. 6496 is the second bill to be introduced which proposes a copyright small claims solution. In July of this year, Rep. Hakeem Jeffries [D-NY] and Rep. Tom Marino [R-PA] introduced H.R. 5757, “The Copyright Alternative in Small-Claims Enforcement (CASE) Act of 2016”. We look forward to working with members of Congress in seeing coypright small claims legislation enacted.

Working with a coalition of visual artist organizations, the Graphic Artists Guild has long advocated for small claims legislation. In a white paper released earlier this year, the coalition recommended the establishment of a copyright small claims tribunal consistent with “Copyright Small Claims,” a report issued by the Copyright Office in September 2013. Coalition members include American Photographic Artists (APA), American Society of Media Photographers (ASMP), Digital Media Licensing Association (DMLA), Graphic Artists Guild (GAG), National Press Photographers Association (NPPA), North American Nature Photography Association (NANPA) and Professional Photographers of America (PPA).

DesignCensus: Respond to AIGA’s Comprehensive Survey of the Design Sector by December 16

Posted by Rebecca Blake on November 30, 2016

Google and AIGA have collaborated on Design Census, a survey to map the educational level, lifestyle, and work habits of designers around the world. International design organizations ico-D, iDSA, and IxDA are supporting partners, as well as SEGD and the National Endowment of the Arts (among others) in the US. The survey is an extension of AIGA’s design survey, and was devised to understand “the complex economic, social, and cultural factors shaping the design practice today.” The survey will be open from December 1-16, and preliminary results will be published shortly afterwards. Designers are encouraged to respond by December 16.

In an attempt to ensure respondents take the survey only once, survey takers must log in with either a Twitter, Google, or AIGA account (all of which are one-way encrypted). The survey responses, though, are entirely anonymous. As a way to encourage engagement with the survey, AIGA is encouraging people to respond to the survey results by creating any content – website, image, poster, animation – which expresses their website, and post it with #designcensus2016.

DesignCensus opening graphic

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Looking to keep up with industry trends and techniques?

Taking your creative career to the next level means you need to be up on a myriad of topics. And as good as your art school education may have been, chances are there are gaps in your education. The Guild’s professional monthly webinar series, Webinar Wednesdays, can help take you to the next level.

Members can join the live webinars for FREE - as part of your benefits of membership! Non-members can join the live webinars for $45. 

Visit our webinar archive page, purchase the webinar of your choice for $35 and watch it any time that works for you.

 


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