| Forgot Password?

Guild Member Discounts: WordPress A-Z Webinar Series and Blinkbid Invoicing Software

Posted by Rebecca Blake on September 29, 2014

Two of our favorite partners, Joy of Code and Blinkbid, have extended new discount offers to Guild members.

WordPress A-Z Webinar SeriesBud Kraus of the Joy of Code has developed a four-part webinar series, WordPress A-Z, taking place October 16, 23, and 30, and November 6. The webinar series covers an overview of WordPress, building a site from start to finish, incorporating a blog, and finding and installing plugins and apps. Guild members are offered the course at a 25% discount, for $100 at the Early Bird rate (expires October 10).

Register for the webinar series online. (You will be asked to provide proof of Guild membership.)

BlinkBid logoBlinkbid produces easy-to-use estimating, production, and invoicing software targeted to creative professionals. Their latest update, Version 7, has added features such as redesigned production module, a discount field, and a Quickbooks export feature. Guild members get $50 of the cost off the purchase price.

To receive the discount code, log into Member Central on the Guild website (in the upper right corner), and visit our Member Discount page.

Exhaustion, Obsolescence, and Self-Worth

Posted by Rebecca Blake on September 24, 2014

In May, designer Jason Santa Maria published an article speculating on what course his career (and life) would take should he ever stop designing websites. Considering the impressive trajectory of his career, the article was notable. Santa Maria is a Senior Designer at Vox Media, founded of Typedia and A Book Apart, formerly worked as creative director of An Event Apart and Typekit, served as an AIGA/NY vice president, authored On Web Typography, and currently teaches at SVA’s Interactive Design program. What would make an individual with such extraordinary experience question his future in his chosen field?

In “What’s Next,” Santa Maria explains that he’s preparing for the possibility that someday he won’t be able to (or interested in) continuing his career in web design: “I don’t think it’s unrealistic to think that there will be a time when I don’t want to, or can’t — due to fatigue or professional obsolescence — work in this industry anymore.” He worries that his own fascination with bygone skills, such as handset typography, and his drive to explore deeply into topics will leave him off-guard as technology progresses. He concludes by speculating that “[f]lexibility in work habits and in thinking, rather than languages and programs, might be our most useful skills.”

However, in a follow-up article, “Correspondence with an Ex-Designer,” Santa Maria reveals a deeper disquiet that lead to his soul searching. A reader named Ruth responded to his earlier article by describing her journey from designer to sheep farmer, reassuring him that “(w)hat’s next — all depends on you, what motivates you and what makes you happy — there will always be new challenges, but that is what life is all about...” In his response, Santa Maria spoke of his “exhaustion [that] comes from the industry often taking more from us than it gives” and his growing sense of disconnect. Again, he found that Ruth’s reply was on target: “Keep working on it — it is important to you, in your own personal development — that development is important — not the expectations of anyone else. Self-worth is so important.”

With the daunting external factors facing creatives — marketplace pressures, client expectations, the unceasing need to up one’s skills — the exchange between Santa Maria and Ruth is particularly reassuring. It highlights the commonality of professional burn-out, and provides some insight into the personal strength individuals can draw from. Here’s to hoping that Santa Maria continues to find his inspiration, and in doing so, share his story.

Photograph of Jason Santa Maria used with permission.

© Jason Saint Maria

For the Font- and Dog-Obsessed

Posted by Rebecca Blake on September 22, 2014

© William Wegman

A fun diversion was published by William Wegman, the artist whose iconic portraits of his dogs Man Ray and Fay Ray brought the Weimaraner dog breed to new heights of popularity in the 1980s. In mid September, Wegman posted on Facebook a short video of his latest crew of Weimeraners patiently modeling letterforms. Up to four dogs stretch, nose to tail, and curl their lanky bodies to create the letterforms as Wegman recites the alphabet.

Wegman has a long history of featuring his dogs in videos. One of his first productions from 1975, Dog Duet, shows Man Ray and Fay Ray oddly staring about the studio space with great intensity. Only at the very end of the short film does Wegman reveal his trick: a tennis ball, moving about off camera, to the great interest of the dogs. An earlier film clip, Spelling Lesson (1973) has Wegman correcting Man Ray’s spelling. It’s an intriguing peek into the wonderful relationship between the artist and his muse.

 
 
Image © William Wegman

Chronicling the (Extra)Ordinary: Tiny PMS Match

Posted by Rebecca Blake on September 18, 2014

© Inka MathewThe Pantone Matching System has gone from being an invaluable tool for designers to a cultural meme. The Pantone company is capitalizing on the public appetite for designer-chic by producing color-swatch themed goods, from iPhone cases, to mugs, stationery, and pencil cases. The creative community has taken inspiration from the iconic swatches, producing their own variations based on superheroes, skin tones, beer, chocolate, and food – both using food to create swatches, and matching food to swatches.

One inspired take on the Pantone system is cataloged in Tiny PMS Match, a blog created by designer Inka Mathew. For the past year, Mathew has been color matching objects from her daily life to Pantone swatches. Since the objects need to fit within a Pantone swatch, they are tiny, nondescript items that ordinarily would be overlooked: seeds, buds, a Froot Loop, a worn toy fish. But as photographic subjects, framed by their swatches, they become imbued with beauty and mystery.

The blog archive also serves as a touching visual journal of everyday life. For example, her travels are chronicled in the swatches, as a French thimble, an English souvenir, and seashells make their appearance. Family life is revealed in a Barbie shoe, children’s vitamins, and a wedding ring. Even the changing seasons are reflected, as the buds of local flowers are replaced with blossoms, seed pods and autumn leaves. It’s a lovely meditation on the extraordinary beauty to be found in an ordinary life.

© Inka Mathew Tiny Pantone Match

Images © Inka Mathew. Used with permission.

Google, Photographers Settle Litigation over Books

Posted by Rebecca Blake on September 10, 2014

NEW YORK, NY – [SEPTEMBER 10, 2014] – A group of photographers, visual artists and affiliated associations have reached a settlement with Google in a lawsuit over copyrighted material in Google Books. The parties are pleased to have reached a settlement that benefits everyone and includes funding for the PLUS Coalition, a non-profit organization dedicated to helping rights holders and users communicate clearly and efficiently about rights in works.

Further terms of the agreement are confidential.

The agreement resolves a copyright infringement lawsuit filed against Google in April, 2010, bringing to an end more than four years of litigation. It does not involve any admission of liability by Google. As the settlement is between the parties to the litigation, the court is not required to approve its terms.

This settlement does not affect Google’s current litigation with the Authors Guild or otherwise address the underlying questions in that suit.

The plaintiffs in the case are rights holder associations and individual visual artists. The associational plaintiffs are The American Society of Media Photographers, Inc., Graphic Artists Guild, PACA (Digital Media Licensing Association), North American Nature Photography Association, Professional Photographers of America, National Press Photographers Association, and American Photographic Artists. The individual plaintiffs are Leif Skoogfors, Al Satterwhite, Morton Beebe, Ed Kashi, John Schmelzer, Simms Taback and Gail Kuenstler Taback Living Trust, Leland Bobbé, John Francis Ficara, and David W. Moser.

The case is American Society of Media Photographers, Inc. et al. v. Google Inc., Case No. 10-CV-02977 (DC) pending in the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York.


About Google Inc. and Associational Parties

Google is a global technology leader focused on improving the ways people connect with information. Google’s innovations in web search and advertising have made its website a top Internet property and its brand one of the most recognized in the world.
Founded in 1944, The American Society of Media Photographers (ASMP) is the premier trade association for the world's most respected photographers.

The Graphic Artists Guild (GAG) is a national union of graphic artists dedicated to promoting and protecting the social, economic and professional interests of its members and for all graphic artists including, animators, cartoonists, designers, illustrators, and digital artists.

PACA (Digital Media Licensing Association) is a trade association established in 1951 whose members include more than 80 companies representing the world of digital content licensing.

NANPA, the North American Nature Photography Association, is the first and premiere association in North America committed solely to serving the field of nature photography.

Professional Photographers of America (PPA) represents more than 27,000 photographers and photographic artists from dozens of specialty areas including portrait, wedding, commercial, advertising and art.

Founded in 1946 the National Press Photographers Association (NPPA) is the “voice of visual journalists” promoting and defending the rights of photographers and journalists, including freedom of the press in all its forms.

The American Photographic Artists (APA) is a leading national organization run by and for professional photographers.

Google is a trademark of Google Inc. All other company and product names may be trademarks of the respective companies with which they are associated.

Next Page

How to Start your Very Own Communication Design Business!

Start Your Own Design Business - booklet cover - image

Digital Download

Enter your email address below to receive a free PDF booklet: How to Start your Very Own Communication Design Business! written by Lara Kisielewska


Guild News

Guild News - Cover Image

We're looking for the following submissions from Guild members:

-Your professional news for the Spotlight column.
Recent achievement, honor, or promotion; new position, business, or product; website launch; published work; exhibit; workshop or conference presentation; etc. Please include your name, discipline, location, and website URL with your submission of 100 words or less.

-Volunteer Illustrator for cover and spot illustrations for a feature article.
Current members only please.
If interested, contact Art Director Sara Chapman for further details at sara@artsquadgraphics.com
Please note: volunteer illustrators create original work for a cover that illustrates the feature story. Illustrators may be chosen at the Art Director's discretion for either the current cover or a future cover, depending on the appropriateness of their style to the topic being illustrated. A volunteer illlustrator will receive credit on the front cover and in the masthead, and a paragraph about the illustrator and his/her work will be printed on page 2.

-Ideas for articles and info you'd like to see in Guild News.

Send all ideas and submissions to:
Deborah Kantor, Editor
dkantor@nycap.rr.com


Share

Follow Us